Eijsden Castle

Eijsden Castle, locally known as Kasteel Eijsden, lies in the village of the same name, in the Limburg province in the Netherlands.

The first building at this site was probably some kind of fortified farm, called the Caestertburg or the Borg. Nothing of that remains. The present castle was built in 1636 by Arnold de Lamargelle. The castle is L-shaped and was built in the Mosan-Renaissance style. There is a bailey and there are large gardens. When the French invaded in 1672 and sieged nearby Maastricht, Prince William III placed his headquarters in Eijsden Castle.

In 1713 ownership of the castle went to Ulrich Anton Johannis, Count of Hoensbroek. Through marriage and inheritance the castle passed to Hubert de Geloes, President of the States of Liège and Loon County (all in present Belgium) in 1729. In 1748 the French Marshal Count Van Löwendal stayed at the castle. A small renovation took place in 1767 but a much larger one was undertaken in 1881-1886.

In 1952 the eastern facade of the gate tower collapsed into the moat. It was rebuilt and the castle was renovated.

It is now a private residence of the Belgian noble family; De Liedekerke.

It is only accessible for groups on appointment. The bailey and gardens are freely accessible.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.castles.nl/eijsden-castle#sigFreeId072e20636a

Eijsden Castle

Eijsden Castle, locally known as Kasteel Eijsden, lies in the village of the same name, in the Limburg province in the Netherlands.

The first building at this site was probably some kind of fortified farm, called the Caestertburg or the Borg. Nothing of that remains. The present castle was built in 1636 by Arnold de Lamargelle. The castle is L-shaped and was built in the Mosan-Renaissance style. There is a bailey and there are large gardens. When the French invaded in 1672 and sieged nearby Maastricht, Prince William III placed his headquarters in Eijsden Castle.

In 1713 ownership of the castle went to Ulrich Anton Johannis, Count of Hoensbroek. Through marriage and inheritance the castle passed to Hubert de Geloes, President of the States of Liège and Loon County (all in present Belgium) in 1729. In 1748 the French Marshal Count Van Löwendal stayed at the castle. A small renovation took place in 1767 but a much larger one was undertaken in 1881-1886.

In 1952 the eastern facade of the gate tower collapsed into the moat. It was rebuilt and the castle was renovated.

It is now a private residence of the Belgian noble family; De Liedekerke.

It is only accessible for groups on appointment. The bailey and gardens are freely accessible.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.castles.nl/eijsden-castle#sigFreeId072e20636a