Embid Castle

Embid Castle, locally known as Castillo de Embid is a small ruined castle in a village by the same name, at the eastern end of the Senorio de Molina, in the province of Guadalajara in Spain.

The village of Embid already existed in the beginning of the repopulation of the Senorio, following the Reconquest, around 1154. The 5th Lady of the Senorio of Molina; Dona Blanca, ordered in her will (at the end of the 12th century) that the village and the surrounding lands were to be left to a knight; Sancho Lopez. But only in 1331 did the property really go into private hands, when King Alfonso XI gave it to a Diego Ordonez de Villaquiran and ordered him to build a castle. In 1347 de Villaquiran sold Embid Castle to another knight; Adan Garcia de Vargas. His daughter; Sancha, sold the castle in 1379 to a Gutierre Ruiz de Vera. After that the castle was passed on into this family until the castle and the surrounding lands were forcibly taken by the Duke of Medinaceli.

In 1426 the Medinaceli family ceded a lot of their possessions in the Senorio of Molina to Don Juan Ruiz de Molina or of the Quemadales, who is called "Caballero Viejo" or the Old Knight in the local chronicles. He rebuilt the castle. The castle was passed on into his family until 1698 when King Carlos II presented it to the 9th Lord of Embid; Don Diego de Molina. His present descendant, Don Luis Diaz Millan, still holds this title.

Embid Castle is built on top of a hill near the edge of the village. It's a typical mountain castle with dwellings at the foot of the hill. Because of it's close proximity to the borders of the Kingdom of Aragon, Embid Castle has served as a place of refuge for Castilians in numerous battles against that kingdom. The castle is very ruinous and is deteriorating. You can see great cracks in the remaining walls. In 1980 the middle of the three towers collapsed. It is feared that the other towers and walls will also collapse in the coming decades because it's being neglected.

Embid Castle can be visited freely.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
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Embid Castle

Embid Castle, locally known as Castillo de Embid is a small ruined castle in a village by the same name, at the eastern end of the Senorio de Molina, in the province of Guadalajara in Spain.

The village of Embid already existed in the beginning of the repopulation of the Senorio, following the Reconquest, around 1154. The 5th Lady of the Senorio of Molina; Dona Blanca, ordered in her will (at the end of the 12th century) that the village and the surrounding lands were to be left to a knight; Sancho Lopez. But only in 1331 did the property really go into private hands, when King Alfonso XI gave it to a Diego Ordonez de Villaquiran and ordered him to build a castle. In 1347 de Villaquiran sold Embid Castle to another knight; Adan Garcia de Vargas. His daughter; Sancha, sold the castle in 1379 to a Gutierre Ruiz de Vera. After that the castle was passed on into this family until the castle and the surrounding lands were forcibly taken by the Duke of Medinaceli.

In 1426 the Medinaceli family ceded a lot of their possessions in the Senorio of Molina to Don Juan Ruiz de Molina or of the Quemadales, who is called "Caballero Viejo" or the Old Knight in the local chronicles. He rebuilt the castle. The castle was passed on into his family until 1698 when King Carlos II presented it to the 9th Lord of Embid; Don Diego de Molina. His present descendant, Don Luis Diaz Millan, still holds this title.

Embid Castle is built on top of a hill near the edge of the village. It's a typical mountain castle with dwellings at the foot of the hill. Because of it's close proximity to the borders of the Kingdom of Aragon, Embid Castle has served as a place of refuge for Castilians in numerous battles against that kingdom. The castle is very ruinous and is deteriorating. You can see great cracks in the remaining walls. In 1980 the middle of the three towers collapsed. It is feared that the other towers and walls will also collapse in the coming decades because it's being neglected.

Embid Castle can be visited freely.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.castles.nl/embid-castle#sigFreeId1a1f79ffa4