Fées Castle

Fées Castle, locally known as Château des Fées, which literally translates to Castle of the Fairies, lies in the woods south of the village of Bertrix, in the province of Luxembourg in the Wallonia region in Belgium.

The remains of Fées Castle are situated on a rocky promontory at the confluence of 2 valleys, that of the Semois river and the Munos stream. Its back was protected by a dry valley connecting the aforementioned valleys.

Archeological evidence shows that the site dates back to Gallo-Roman times (3th-4th century) when it was probably used by the Leti, barbaric auxiliary troops, during the reign of the Roman Emperor Maximian.

The site was in use until the 11th-12th century.

Archeological excavations showed remains of an entrance, curtain walls, a tower and a dwelling. At present only low walls are to be seen with little architectural detail.

In 1706 the site is mentioned in an order of Louis XIV of France as one of a set of 28 sites along the Semois river designed to protect this boundary, like Montragut Castle or Liresse Castle.

The site of Fées Castle is freely accessible.

There is not much to see here but the wooded environment is beautiful.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.castles.nl/fees-castle#sigFreeId1ee662f292

Fées Castle

Fées Castle, locally known as Château des Fées, which literally translates to Castle of the Fairies, lies in the woods south of the village of Bertrix, in the province of Luxembourg in the Wallonia region in Belgium.

The remains of Fées Castle are situated on a rocky promontory at the confluence of 2 valleys, that of the Semois river and the Munos stream. Its back was protected by a dry valley connecting the aforementioned valleys.

Archeological evidence shows that the site dates back to Gallo-Roman times (3th-4th century) when it was probably used by the Leti, barbaric auxiliary troops, during the reign of the Roman Emperor Maximian.

The site was in use until the 11th-12th century.

Archeological excavations showed remains of an entrance, curtain walls, a tower and a dwelling. At present only low walls are to be seen with little architectural detail.

In 1706 the site is mentioned in an order of Louis XIV of France as one of a set of 28 sites along the Semois river designed to protect this boundary, like Montragut Castle or Liresse Castle.

The site of Fées Castle is freely accessible.

There is not much to see here but the wooded environment is beautiful.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.castles.nl/fees-castle#sigFreeId1ee662f292