Kirlish Castle

Kirlish Castle, also known as Castle Curlews, lies north of the village of Drumquin, in County Tyrone, in Northern Ireland.

It is said that Kirlish Castle was built in 1617 by Sir John Davies, although he might have incorporated an already existing tower house. During that time Davies also built Derg Castle and connected them both with a straight causeway which was 7 miles long. Davies was Attorney General for Ireland during the reign of King James I. He died in 1626 leaving his daughter as his sole heir. She lived in England and probably did not take possession of her Irish castles.

After that Kirlish Castle is not mentioned any more. It may have been damaged during the Irish rising of 1641, but this is uncertain. There is evidence of a bawn connected to the castle, although its construction date is unknown.

A small archeological excavation showed that the castle building later probably had an agricultural use and fell to ruin causing several collapses. It is also quite possible that the castle was largely demolished for its stone.

At present the remains of Kirlish Castle are on the grounds of a private farm. So they can not freely be visited. Although the friendly farmer may grant access if asked, as he did me. This is a small ruin, the chimneys are nice to see.


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Kirlish Castle

Kirlish Castle, also known as Castle Curlews, lies north of the village of Drumquin, in County Tyrone, in Northern Ireland.

It is said that Kirlish Castle was built in 1617 by Sir John Davies, although he might have incorporated an already existing tower house. During that time Davies also built Derg Castle and connected them both with a straight causeway which was 7 miles long. Davies was Attorney General for Ireland during the reign of King James I. He died in 1626 leaving his daughter as his sole heir. She lived in England and probably did not take possession of her Irish castles.

After that Kirlish Castle is not mentioned any more. It may have been damaged during the Irish rising of 1641, but this is uncertain. There is evidence of a bawn connected to the castle, although its construction date is unknown.

A small archeological excavation showed that the castle building later probably had an agricultural use and fell to ruin causing several collapses. It is also quite possible that the castle was largely demolished for its stone.

At present the remains of Kirlish Castle are on the grounds of a private farm. So they can not freely be visited. Although the friendly farmer may grant access if asked, as he did me. This is a small ruin, the chimneys are nice to see.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.castles.nl/kirlish-castle#sigFreeId97b15bae60