Kuinre Castle

Kuinre Castle, (called Kuinre Castle I by archeologists), locally known as the Kuinderburcht, lies in the Kuinderforest, south of the village of Kuinre in the province of Flevoland in the Netherlands.

Kuinre Castle was built around 1204 by a Heinricus Grus, a vassal of the bishop of Utrecht. It was preceded by another fortification which was built in the middle of the 12th century but which was destroyed in 1197 by Willem of Holland. It is unknown if this earlier fortification was situated at the same location as Kuinre Castle. Kuinre Castle was a frontier castle from the bishop to protect his authority in this area. Later on it also fell under the influence of the Count of Holland. The Lords of Kuinre became important and even had the right to mint coins.

In the third quarter of the 14th century Kuinre Castle was abandoned. Probably as a result of a great flood in 1375, further habitation at this site was made impossible due to large inundations in the surrouding area which enlarged the former Zuidersea. A new Kuinre Castle (called Kuinre Castle II by archeologists) was built in 1378 a kilometer further eastwards. Of that castle nothing visible remains at present.

The remains of Kuinre Castle remained forgotten on the bottom of the Zuidersea for centuries. Water eroded everything above ground. In 1941 this part of the Zuidersea was reclaimed and the sparse remains of both Kuinre Castles were discovered. Several excavations campaigns followed; in 1943, 1948-9 and in 1999. What was found were foundations of the arches which supported the circular curtain wall and the beds of the moats. Based on the excavations it can be concluded that Kuinre Castle was probably a circular castle situated on a small artificial hill (a motte) encircled by several moats. Evidence was found for a stone building incorporated in the curtain wall.

In 1989 the complete site was reconstructed as a circular moated island with the rebuilt foundations of the circular curtain wall, a small arch and a stone well. So what we see today is completely artificial but suits to keep alive the memory of the history at this site.

An interesting remnant. Freely accessible.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.castles.nl/kuinre-castle#sigFreeId7eafce9ff5

Kuinre Castle

Kuinre Castle, (called Kuinre Castle I by archeologists), locally known as the Kuinderburcht, lies in the Kuinderforest, south of the village of Kuinre in the province of Flevoland in the Netherlands.

Kuinre Castle was built around 1204 by a Heinricus Grus, a vassal of the bishop of Utrecht. It was preceded by another fortification which was built in the middle of the 12th century but which was destroyed in 1197 by Willem of Holland. It is unknown if this earlier fortification was situated at the same location as Kuinre Castle. Kuinre Castle was a frontier castle from the bishop to protect his authority in this area. Later on it also fell under the influence of the Count of Holland. The Lords of Kuinre became important and even had the right to mint coins.

In the third quarter of the 14th century Kuinre Castle was abandoned. Probably as a result of a great flood in 1375, further habitation at this site was made impossible due to large inundations in the surrouding area which enlarged the former Zuidersea. A new Kuinre Castle (called Kuinre Castle II by archeologists) was built in 1378 a kilometer further eastwards. Of that castle nothing visible remains at present.

The remains of Kuinre Castle remained forgotten on the bottom of the Zuidersea for centuries. Water eroded everything above ground. In 1941 this part of the Zuidersea was reclaimed and the sparse remains of both Kuinre Castles were discovered. Several excavations campaigns followed; in 1943, 1948-9 and in 1999. What was found were foundations of the arches which supported the circular curtain wall and the beds of the moats. Based on the excavations it can be concluded that Kuinre Castle was probably a circular castle situated on a small artificial hill (a motte) encircled by several moats. Evidence was found for a stone building incorporated in the curtain wall.

In 1989 the complete site was reconstructed as a circular moated island with the rebuilt foundations of the circular curtain wall, a small arch and a stone well. So what we see today is completely artificial but suits to keep alive the memory of the history at this site.

An interesting remnant. Freely accessible.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.castles.nl/kuinre-castle#sigFreeId7eafce9ff5