Málaga Alcazaba

Málaga Alcazaba, locally known as Alcazaba de Málaga, lies on a spur in the center of the city with the same name in the province with the same name in Spain.

The first building at this site may have been a Phoenician fort, but it was certainly occupied in Roman times.

Málaga Alcazaba was built as a palace-fortress for the Moorish rulers of the city. It was founded by Badis Maksan but Abd ar-Rahman I, Emir of Córdoba, finished the building during the 8th century, adding other structures.

During the 11th century the alcazaba was extensively rebuilt by Badis, the Zirid King of the Taifa of Granada.

Between the 13th and 16th centuries Málaga Alcazaba underwent several rebuilding campaigns and was connected with the 14th century Gibralfaro Castle on the adjoining upper hill.

The alcazaba consists of two elongated walled enclosures. The outer enclosure, built around the topography of the spur, completely encloses the inner one and is equipped with several defensive towers and gates. It was formerly connected to the city ramparts which formed a third defensive wall but these have disappeared in the 19th century.

Entrance to the outer enclosure is through a series of gates built at an angle to make progress difficult for attacking forces. Entrance to the inner enclosure is through a gate at its western side. The ruined keep is at its eastern side, also guarding the gate leading to the walled ramp that connected the alcazaba to the castle.

Inside the inner enclosure there are lush gardens with ingenious waterworks and a Nazari palace which must have been very luxurious in its time.

In 1487, the Catholic Monarchs captured the city after a long siege, and raised their standard on the keep in the inner enclosure.

The alcazaba was restored in the 1930's. And although this was done very neatly it is a bit too much for my taste.

At present Málaga Alcazaba can be visited for a small fee. It is said to be the best preserved alcazaba in Spain. A visit is really worth your while although you are only allowed to visit half of the entire complex. There is also a recently excavated Roman amphitheatre at the foot of the alcazaba.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
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Málaga Alcazaba

Málaga Alcazaba, locally known as Alcazaba de Málaga, lies on a spur in the center of the city with the same name in the province with the same name in Spain.

The first building at this site may have been a Phoenician fort, but it was certainly occupied in Roman times.

Málaga Alcazaba was built as a palace-fortress for the Moorish rulers of the city. It was founded by Badis Maksan but Abd ar-Rahman I, Emir of Córdoba, finished the building during the 8th century, adding other structures.

During the 11th century the alcazaba was extensively rebuilt by Badis, the Zirid King of the Taifa of Granada.

Between the 13th and 16th centuries Málaga Alcazaba underwent several rebuilding campaigns and was connected with the 14th century Gibralfaro Castle on the adjoining upper hill.

The alcazaba consists of two elongated walled enclosures. The outer enclosure, built around the topography of the spur, completely encloses the inner one and is equipped with several defensive towers and gates. It was formerly connected to the city ramparts which formed a third defensive wall but these have disappeared in the 19th century.

Entrance to the outer enclosure is through a series of gates built at an angle to make progress difficult for attacking forces. Entrance to the inner enclosure is through a gate at its western side. The ruined keep is at its eastern side, also guarding the gate leading to the walled ramp that connected the alcazaba to the castle.

Inside the inner enclosure there are lush gardens with ingenious waterworks and a Nazari palace which must have been very luxurious in its time.

In 1487, the Catholic Monarchs captured the city after a long siege, and raised their standard on the keep in the inner enclosure.

The alcazaba was restored in the 1930's. And although this was done very neatly it is a bit too much for my taste.

At present Málaga Alcazaba can be visited for a small fee. It is said to be the best preserved alcazaba in Spain. A visit is really worth your while although you are only allowed to visit half of the entire complex. There is also a recently excavated Roman amphitheatre at the foot of the alcazaba.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.castles.nl/malaga-alcazaba#sigFreeIdd728089e30