Mountjoy Castle

Mountjoy Castle lies on a hill overlooking Lough Neagh, in the hamlet of Brockagh, north east of the town of Coalisland, in County Tyrone, in Northern Ireland.

Mountjoy Castle was built as a campaign fort between 1602 and 1605 by the British Earl of Mountjoy, who was Lord Deputy of Ireland. He started construction of the present castle after he had captured the, now dissappeared, O'Neill fort of Fuath na nGall, which translates as 'Hatred of Foreigners'.

Mountjoy Castle was built out of distinctive red clay bricks, manufactured locally at Coalisland. It is 2 storeys high, the lower storey being stone-faced on the outside. It consists of a central rectangular block with 4 spear-shaped angle towers with gun loops. The north west tower is partly demolished and the west curtain wall is destroyed.

In the war of 1641 Mountjoy Castle was taken by Turlough O'Neill, who kept possession of it till his total defeat by General Monro, in 1643. It was dismantled by order of parliament in 1648 and it has been in ruins since.

This structure is more like a fort than a castle and I found it difficult to get a sense of how the castle must have looked originally. The castle is freely accessible.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.castles.nl/mountjoy-castle#sigFreeId71bd93499a

Mountjoy Castle

Mountjoy Castle lies on a hill overlooking Lough Neagh, in the hamlet of Brockagh, north east of the town of Coalisland, in County Tyrone, in Northern Ireland.

Mountjoy Castle was built as a campaign fort between 1602 and 1605 by the British Earl of Mountjoy, who was Lord Deputy of Ireland. He started construction of the present castle after he had captured the, now dissappeared, O'Neill fort of Fuath na nGall, which translates as 'Hatred of Foreigners'.

Mountjoy Castle was built out of distinctive red clay bricks, manufactured locally at Coalisland. It is 2 storeys high, the lower storey being stone-faced on the outside. It consists of a central rectangular block with 4 spear-shaped angle towers with gun loops. The north west tower is partly demolished and the west curtain wall is destroyed.

In the war of 1641 Mountjoy Castle was taken by Turlough O'Neill, who kept possession of it till his total defeat by General Monro, in 1643. It was dismantled by order of parliament in 1648 and it has been in ruins since.

This structure is more like a fort than a castle and I found it difficult to get a sense of how the castle must have looked originally. The castle is freely accessible.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.castles.nl/mountjoy-castle#sigFreeId71bd93499a