Year of visit

  • 2009

Location

Adress: Near Nijenbeekseweg 48, Voorst, The Netherlands.

Website

Nijenbeek Castle

Nijenbeek Castle, locally known as Kasteel Nijenbeek, lies north east of the village of Voorst, in the province of Gelderland in the Netherlands.

Nijenbeek Castle was first mentioned in 1266 as a fortified house on the banks of the IJssel river. It was owned by a Dirk, Lord of Nijenbeek. It was built at a strategic site at a bend of the river. Especially under the rule of Count Otto I of Guelders (1184-1207) there was continual warfare with the Bishop of Utrecht, which caused the position of Nijenbeek Castle, near the border of the Oversticht, to be of great strategic importance.

The keep was probably built after 1255 when the region settled down. Also some outbuildings, stables and sheds, and a flour mill were build near the keep. In 1296 there was no record of a separate bailey. But from then on a bailey gradually developed until 1383 when a full bailey was mentioned in a deed.

At the beginning of the 16th century the castle seems to have lost its strategic importance. In 1506 Charles of Egmond, Duke of Guelders, sold the castle. In 1523 the bailey was partially demolished which caused the castle to lose its defensive disposition. Shortly after 1533 the castle was adjusted for permanent habitation.

During the 80-Years War, the castle suffered considerable damage due to a Spanish siege in 1585 and a siege by the State troops a year later.

In 1672 John Maurice, Prince of Nassau-Siegen, moved into the castle and deployed an army of 22.000 men alongside the IJssel river. But it didn't come to a battle. However the French occupied the entire Veluwe region, Nijenbeek Castle, as opposed to other castles, wasn't destroyed. Probably because the then owner; Johan Thomas van Steenbergen, had gotten a safeguard from the Duke of Luxembourg; one of the French army commanders.

In the middle of the 18th century and in the 19th and 20th century the castle underwent some renovations.

In 1945 the whole castle was shelled by Canadian troops because the castle was used by the German troops as a lookout post. Since then the castle fell into decay.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.castles.nl/nijenbeek-castle#sigFreeIde48685ae8b

Year of visit

  • 2009

Location

Adress: Near Nijenbeekseweg 48, Voorst, The Netherlands.

Website

Year of visit

  • 2009

Location

Adress: Near Nijenbeekseweg 48, Voorst, The Netherlands.

Website

Nijenbeek Castle

Nijenbeek Castle, locally known as Kasteel Nijenbeek, lies north east of the village of Voorst, in the province of Gelderland in the Netherlands.

Nijenbeek Castle was first mentioned in 1266 as a fortified house on the banks of the IJssel river. It was owned by a Dirk, Lord of Nijenbeek. It was built at a strategic site at a bend of the river. Especially under the rule of Count Otto I of Guelders (1184-1207) there was continual warfare with the Bishop of Utrecht, which caused the position of Nijenbeek Castle, near the border of the Oversticht, to be of great strategic importance.

The keep was probably built after 1255 when the region settled down. Also some outbuildings, stables and sheds, and a flour mill were build near the keep. In 1296 there was no record of a separate bailey. But from then on a bailey gradually developed until 1383 when a full bailey was mentioned in a deed.

At the beginning of the 16th century the castle seems to have lost its strategic importance. In 1506 Charles of Egmond, Duke of Guelders, sold the castle. In 1523 the bailey was partially demolished which caused the castle to lose its defensive disposition. Shortly after 1533 the castle was adjusted for permanent habitation.

During the 80-Years War, the castle suffered considerable damage due to a Spanish siege in 1585 and a siege by the State troops a year later.

In 1672 John Maurice, Prince of Nassau-Siegen, moved into the castle and deployed an army of 22.000 men alongside the IJssel river. But it didn't come to a battle. However the French occupied the entire Veluwe region, Nijenbeek Castle, as opposed to other castles, wasn't destroyed. Probably because the then owner; Johan Thomas van Steenbergen, had gotten a safeguard from the Duke of Luxembourg; one of the French army commanders.

In the middle of the 18th century and in the 19th and 20th century the castle underwent some renovations.

In 1945 the whole castle was shelled by Canadian troops because the castle was used by the German troops as a lookout post. Since then the castle fell into decay.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.castles.nl/nijenbeek-castle#sigFreeIde48685ae8b

Year of visit

  • 2009

Location

Adress: Near Nijenbeekseweg 48, Voorst, The Netherlands.

Website