Year of visit
  • 2008

Location

Adress: Behind Bowlespark 1a, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Wageningen Castle

Wageningen Castle, locally known as Kasteel van Wageningen, lies in the city of Wageningen in the province of Gelderland in the Netherlands.

Wageningen Castle was built between 1500 and 1526 by Karel van Egmond, Duke of Gelre, as protection against the Dukes of Burgundy. The castle was built, in the south eastern corner of the already fortified town of Wageningen.

When Karel died in 1528, the towns people of Wageningen demanded the demolition of the castle, as they felt more oppressed than protected by its presence. The States of Gelre however, not only prohibited this, also because Burgundian troops had already advanced to nearby Rhenen, but even gave the owner of the castle permission to complete the castle. When the castle was finished, it was equipped with a curtain wall with several gun towers, a gate building with two flanking towers, barracks, a brewery, a bakery, a powder storage house, a well and stables for horses and dogs.

At the end of the 16th century the towns people of Wageningen made another attempt to get rid of the castle. This time the States General prohibited this because the 80-Years War was going on.

In 1614 Wageningen Castle was sold to Lubbert Torck by the States of Gelre. In 1672 the town and castle were taken by French troops which left the castle badly damaged. After this, the then residing Lord Assueer Torck thoroughly rebuilt the castle into a manor with stables and gardens. Between 1711 and 1720 the entire complex was torn down by his son Lubbert Adolph Torck. He built the present 18th century manor on the remains of the former gate building and several other houses, which he rented out while he himself was living in Rosendael Castle.

In later years the Torck family sold all the houses. The manor itself was sold in 1829 to a Jacob Rosenik who thoroughly rebuilt it. In 1882 the manor and former castle grounds were sold to Johannes Bowles, a plantation owner who had made his fortune in the Dutch East Indies. He turned the entire complex into an urban neighborhood with several villas and almost all the castle remains disappeared.

Archeological excavations in the 1970's unearthed parts of the foundations of Wageningen Castle. These foundations of the northern curtain wall, the north eastern corner tower and the northern tower of the gate building are what we see at present. The manor is now in use as a museum.

The castle remains are freely accessible.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.castles.nl/wageningen-castle#sigFreeIdd34dc8c811

Year of visit
  • 2008

Location

Adress: Behind Bowlespark 1a, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Year of visit
  • 2008

Location

Adress: Behind Bowlespark 1a, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Wageningen Castle

Wageningen Castle, locally known as Kasteel van Wageningen, lies in the city of Wageningen in the province of Gelderland in the Netherlands.

Wageningen Castle was built between 1500 and 1526 by Karel van Egmond, Duke of Gelre, as protection against the Dukes of Burgundy. The castle was built, in the south eastern corner of the already fortified town of Wageningen.

When Karel died in 1528, the towns people of Wageningen demanded the demolition of the castle, as they felt more oppressed than protected by its presence. The States of Gelre however, not only prohibited this, also because Burgundian troops had already advanced to nearby Rhenen, but even gave the owner of the castle permission to complete the castle. When the castle was finished, it was equipped with a curtain wall with several gun towers, a gate building with two flanking towers, barracks, a brewery, a bakery, a powder storage house, a well and stables for horses and dogs.

At the end of the 16th century the towns people of Wageningen made another attempt to get rid of the castle. This time the States General prohibited this because the 80-Years War was going on.

In 1614 Wageningen Castle was sold to Lubbert Torck by the States of Gelre. In 1672 the town and castle were taken by French troops which left the castle badly damaged. After this, the then residing Lord Assueer Torck thoroughly rebuilt the castle into a manor with stables and gardens. Between 1711 and 1720 the entire complex was torn down by his son Lubbert Adolph Torck. He built the present 18th century manor on the remains of the former gate building and several other houses, which he rented out while he himself was living in Rosendael Castle.

In later years the Torck family sold all the houses. The manor itself was sold in 1829 to a Jacob Rosenik who thoroughly rebuilt it. In 1882 the manor and former castle grounds were sold to Johannes Bowles, a plantation owner who had made his fortune in the Dutch East Indies. He turned the entire complex into an urban neighborhood with several villas and almost all the castle remains disappeared.

Archeological excavations in the 1970's unearthed parts of the foundations of Wageningen Castle. These foundations of the northern curtain wall, the north eastern corner tower and the northern tower of the gate building are what we see at present. The manor is now in use as a museum.

The castle remains are freely accessible.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.castles.nl/wageningen-castle#sigFreeIdd34dc8c811

Year of visit
  • 2008

Location

Adress: Behind Bowlespark 1a, Wageningen, The Netherlands.