Warblington Castle

Warblington Castle, lies on a farm, east of the town of Havant, in the county of Hampshire in England.

Warblington Castle was a manor house probably dating back to 11th or 12th century. In 1340 its owner, Thomas Monthermer, is supposed to have recieved a licence to crenellate and thus effictively turning the manor into a castle.

The manor passed through several hands before coming into the possession of Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick in the 15th century. At that time Warblington Castle was rather neglected.

In 1513 the castle was given to Margaret Pole by King Henry VII. She had the castle rebuilt in a moated manor. It is the remainder of that castle that we can see today.

In 1551 King Henry VII granted it to Sir Richard Cotton. During the 16th century several royals visited Warblington Castle. The descendants of Richard Cotton held the castle until the English Civil War in 1644. Then the castle was slighted by Parliamentarian forces as the Cottons were Royalists.

What remains today is an early Tudor brick octagonal turret of 4 stories high which was part of the 16th century gatehouse.

Warblington Castle is situated on private ground. It can not be visited but easily seen from the public road. A nice tower.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
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Warblington Castle

Warblington Castle, lies on a farm, east of the town of Havant, in the county of Hampshire in England.

Warblington Castle was a manor house probably dating back to 11th or 12th century. In 1340 its owner, Thomas Monthermer, is supposed to have recieved a licence to crenellate and thus effictively turning the manor into a castle.

The manor passed through several hands before coming into the possession of Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick in the 15th century. At that time Warblington Castle was rather neglected.

In 1513 the castle was given to Margaret Pole by King Henry VII. She had the castle rebuilt in a moated manor. It is the remainder of that castle that we can see today.

In 1551 King Henry VII granted it to Sir Richard Cotton. During the 16th century several royals visited Warblington Castle. The descendants of Richard Cotton held the castle until the English Civil War in 1644. Then the castle was slighted by Parliamentarian forces as the Cottons were Royalists.

What remains today is an early Tudor brick octagonal turret of 4 stories high which was part of the 16th century gatehouse.

Warblington Castle is situated on private ground. It can not be visited but easily seen from the public road. A nice tower.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.castles.nl/warblington-castle#sigFreeIde0a5b1d9cb